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Digital Wolf Magazine | Third Edition | Hub Printing in Shelbyville, Indiana Released on April 7, 2020 | Pink Full Moon


Photo taken by Shelby Lopez

When we launched Digital Wolf Magazine in 2018, we sought to reveal and connect people via a common thread- that they each had a talent worthy of celebrating that deserved greater exposure. We also anticipated that they would benefit from the opportunity to reach out and collaborate with each other, and we were excited to present a venue that would help to make it happen. We dubbed these artists, musicians, and other skilled craftspeople ‘Creative Natives’ because they shared the common geography of Indiana as their home, though some have followed their callings beyond the state lines. Our second issue’s theme of ‘Mixed Expressions’ focused on the human figure in its many forms, personified through the art, the unique talents, and the people who profiled themselves. The designation of ‘Creative Natives’ continued to ring true, as each maintained a strong connection to their Hoosier roots, with the subjects thriving locally, in other parts of the state, and even as far away as New Zealand. For this issue, Digital Wolf is turning its attention closer to home, putting an emphasis on our literal and spiritual home base of Rochester, Indiana. Despite the façade of being just another faded small town trying to find its niche in a rapidly changing world, we know that in reality, Rochester is a tight-knit community with a rich history behind it, and a vibrant future waiting to be realized. In this issue, we dive deep into the heart of Rochester, revealing some of its storied past, introducing key members and businesses in the community, and looking ahead to how the future might be shaped by people who are more engaged with visions to restore, revive, and refresh the potential of their beloved hometown. Since its inception, Digital Wolf Magazine has championed and facilitated the idea of collaboration, and believe that the key to helping Rochester realize its growing potential is encouraging the community to shop local businesses, support local organizations, create and patronize local art and ideas, and celebrate local pride by being an active part of making our little town as great as we know it can be.


HISTORIC IRON FENCE Built by Haugh & Company, Indianapolis, this majestic wrought iron fence was original located at the Fulton County courthouse which was built in 1847. When the current courthouse was built in 1895, the fence was moved to the County Poor Farm about 1 mile south of current day Rochester on SR 25. When the Poor Farm closed in 1966, the land, buildings and fence were sold to Robert Peterson. In 2017, Peterson and his wife Martha made a donation to the Centennial Park project returning portions of the beautiful fence to within 100 feet of its original 1847 courthouse home. - Shirley Willard | Fulton County Historian

Photo taken by Shelby Lopez

Copyright by Digital Wolf Network 2020.